Stage 2 Sources

OSHA

Haedt, Russel. “OSHA Compliance for Tattoo Parlors.” OSHA. US BioClean, 20 Mar. 2014. Web. 6 Nov. 2016.

This article was very helpful with the the medical side of tattoos, and the regulations.  It went over the basic requirements for a tattoo parlor to run.  When getting a tattoo, the artist must be wearing gloves, the table must be tarped, the gun must be covered in plastic, the needles must be fresh, the ink must be in a small container, and so on.  All these materials used can only be used once and then they must be disposed of in a hazardous waste basket.  These baskets are handled by professional companies and have two options for the disposal process.  The first is incineration and then the waste from incineration goes into a sanitary landfill.  The second process is using an autoclave to sterilize the waste with steam.  After the waste is sterilized it is placed in sanitary landfills, just like the incinerated waste.  This is where these products go after their use in tattoo parlors.  This related to my research on the waste created by tattoo parlors, most the waste comes from sanitary precautions and not the actual tattoo guns.  Questions that this lead to are whether or not this is a productive system and if we could be taking different steps to produce less waste.  

Patent

Theiss, Scott Marsh, Pasco Forsyth Parker, Michael Maurice Banks, and Marty Law Banks. “Tattoo Machine.” US6033421A. Google Patent, 2000. Web. 06 Nov. 2016.

This is a google patent for a tattoo machine that I based my research off of for the different metals and plastics used for tattoo guns.  Google patents told me the main components, the first is the body of the gun.  This is normally made out of metal but can also have plastic components to it as well.  The metal is normally stainless steel which is mainly produced and distributed in China, I found this by doing further research into where the materials came from.  The disposal process for metals is normally melting and reusing, I researched further to find this.  For the plastic components, these are generally from Russia, the source map told me this information.  Plastic is normally recycled as well, the tattoo guns have to be taken apart for this recycling to happen.  The motor in a tattoo gun is encased in metal and has copper coils inside, this is what powers the gun.  These copper coils come from a distributing plant in Germany, I found this using source map.  This aligns with the other research I have done regarding materials and where they originate and where they are produced and manufactured.  Questions this lead to were what kinds of labor is used to mine and produce these products?

Biohazards

“Where Does Biohazardous Waste Go?” Where Does Biohazardous Waste Go? AfterMath, n.d. Web. 06 Nov. 2016.

This article was about the way biohazardous waste is disposed of.  This helped with where the medical materials went after use for sanitary disposal.  These baskets are handled by professional companies and have two options for the disposal process.  The first is incineration and then the waste from incineration goes into a sanitary landfill.  The second process is using an autoclave to sterilize the waste with steam.  After the waste is sterilized it is placed in sanitary landfills, just like the incinerated waste.  This related to my research on the waste behind tattoo parlors.  It also related to the OSHA research I had done.  Questions it brought up were if this was a good way to deal with waste and whether or not we should be looking for new ways to do this?

 

 

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