Author Tone Analysis and Introductory Paragraphs

Tone Analysis for  Consider The Fork, “Introduction” and “Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn’t.”

Intermixed with their examples and analyses of various cooking tools, the author of “Introduction” adds in vivid imagery and humorous commentary that breathes life into something as mundane as a technological breakdown of the wooden spoon. While there is no doubt that the author is extremely well versed in the various components of kitchen tools and cooking, they do their best to shy away from jargon and fact bombarding and instead choose to include their readers in the discussion. This is accomplished through engaging the reader with questions and second-person writing. As early as the second paragraph of the piece, the author is providing commands such as “look closer at one of your wooden spoons” and “look at the shape” in order to get the reader involved in thinking about the hidden intricacies of spoons. This allows the author to capture and hold the reader’s attention, even as they move through other tools. Later on, when the author shifts over to mainly first person, they continue to keep the tone light and casual by giving us a glimpse into their daily life and experiences with various coking technologies. This allows us to form some conclusions about our culture and routines and their relationship with the technologies we use on a daily basis.

Rae Bichell, author of “Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn’t”, also strives for a casual tone in her article by forgoing formal language for a more informal writing style. Despite the more “laid-back” feel of this piece, the simplicity of the author’s descriptions allows us to easily see her take on the relationship between technology and culture. In this particular article, the “superclean” culture of Americans is what influenced the various technologies that keep our food fresh and clean for as long as possible. Certainly her use simile in the statement “the coating is like a little safety vest for the egg” bring some humorous images to the mind as well.

What I want to focus on the most when incorporating the styles and tones used in the writings above are their use of second person and some informal language in order to engage the reader. It is far easier to pay attention and absorb the main ideas of the piece if the reader is engaged. Otherwise, the further the reader goes, the more likely key information is going to lip through the cracks.

Original Introduction

Since the dawn of mankind, humans have developed numerous ways to combat the deadly forces of nature developing alongside them. From the first torch to ward off saber-tooth tigers to the development of equipment to sense natural disasters, mankind has found ways to come out on top. In the early 20th century, humans were capable of besting every other organism on Earth given the right equipment. Every organism, except for one so small, so infinitesimal that it was invisible to the naked eye. This organism was the bacterium. Bacteria has wrecked havoc on humans for centuries, with body counts well into the billions. It wasn’t until the development of the antibiotic in the 19th century that humans had an answer for bacterial infections. For decades antibiotics killed off bacteria and saved countless human lives; however, mankind was too eager in its usage of the miracle drug and failed to take into account the other effects antibiotics had. Much like humans, bacteria adapted and slowly began developing resistances to various antibiotics. Antibiotics that worked the first time began having much more trouble killing off a similar strain of bacteria. The discovery of antibiotics has produced numerous advancements within our society, but one day, the immediate benefits of antibiotics will be overtaken by their long term consequences for both our bodies and our environment. To this day, humanity still faces issues of antibiotics resistant bacteria, stemming from antibiotic neglect and overuse. The long term consequences of antibiotic use will not only affect our bodies, but our environment as well. By looking at what humanity did before antibiotics, the environmental footprint of antibiotics, and human cultural reactions to antibiotics, we can see the various ways that these consequences can affect us as time goes on.

Revised Introduction

Think back to the last time that you or someone in your life has went to the doctor for an illness or recieved some sort of surgery. Chances are, an antibiotic was prescribed and you were on your way, and the surgery was rather uneventful. This is the peace of mind that antibiotics has afforded us. Before, illnesses and surgery were things to be very concerned about, and for mainly one reason: the bacterium. Bacteria has wrecked havoc on humans for centuries, with body counts well into the billions. Any open wound was an invitiation for infection. It wasn’t until the development of the antibiotic in the 19th century that humans had an answer for bacterial infections. For decades antibiotics killed off bacteria and saved countless human lives; however, mankind was too eager in its usage of the miracle drug and failed to take into account the other effects antibiotics had. Much like humans, bacteria adapted and slowly began developing resistances to various antibiotics. Antibiotics that worked the first time began having much more trouble killing off a similar strain of bacteria. The discovery of antibiotics has produced numerous advancements within our society, but one day, the immediate benefits of antibiotics will be overtaken by their long term consequences for both our bodies and our environment. To this day, humanity still faces issues of antibiotics resistant bacteria, stemming from antibiotic neglect and overuse. Our society must find a way to strike a balance in its use, before it is lost to us forever.

-Connor Hill

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