Scholarly Article AB 2

Harris, Gillian et al. “”Seeing The Baby”: Pleasures And Dilemmas Of Ultrasound Technologies For Primiparous Australian Women”. Medical Anthropology Quarterly, vol 18, no. 1, 2004, pp. 23-47. Wiley-Blackwell, doi:10.1525/maq.2004.18.1.23.

Throughout the scholarly article”Seeing The Baby”: Pleasures And Dilemmas Of Ultrasound Technologies For Primiparous Australian Women”, the authors main purpose is to show how the true medical reasoning of ultrasounds have been lost. However, they have a good reason to be kept around for the mother herself and her mental health. Many women have anxieties about pregnancy and getting ultrasounds, nonetheless, once receiving them these anxieties often go away. We see this when the authors state, “Anxiety in relation to the 18-20-week scan was articulated more in terms of lingering, ever-present doubts about the abilities of women’s bodies to cope with a pregnancy” (Anxiety and Reassurance).

The authors can be seen as credible as they interview women and have done studies on how they feel. They are appealing to the audience by bringing up the anxieties that women are having themselves while being pregnant. By drawing on the emotions of women, and finding a way to connect with the audience they develop a stronger relationship and trust in what they are saying. However, their main arguments bring up the ethical question of if we even need ultrasounds. Some believe that there is no medical need for this technology, but others disagree.

This article was useful as it also showed that there is more anxiety around the second trimester ultrasound, when the gender is determined.  “Some women who had multiple scans deemed the 18-20-week scan the most pleasurable. There was greater possibility of distinguishing “little legs and little arms” (Cara). It was also the first opportunity to photography and videotape the baby” (Seeing for Pleasure). This is also adding to the evidence of the main focus of ultrasound being all based on gender.

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