Hypodermic Needle Monograph

Battjes, Robert J., and Roy W. Pickens, editors. Needle Sharing Among Intravenous Drug Abusers: National and International Perspectives. National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1988.

This monograph provided very valuable and interesting information about intravenous drug abusing nationally and internationally, and discussed the issue of HIV/AIDS transmission throughout the world. The authors explained throughout the book that intravenous drug using is a major element in the spreading of disease all around the world (this book focusing primarily on the spread of HIV/AIDS). The tables were of most interest to me, and provided excellent information about the contraction of HIV/AIDS among intravenous drug users. An interesting detail was that in Italy and Spain around 60% of people who had contracted AIDS were intravenous drug users, demonstrating how the needle could spread disease easily. The monograph also had general information on needle sharing among intravenous drug users, along with information on needle sharing and transmission of AIDS in the US, Europe, and specific cases such as New York City. This gave valuable insight into the sharing of needles and transmission of disease around the world. This source directly relates to the source about Hepatitis C and its transmission, as both HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C can spread through needle sharing. Also, it connects to the movie Trainspotting, where an intravenous drug abuser contracted HIV through the sharing of needles, and this monograph gives real life examples of this. A question that may follow this would be “what other diseases spread quickly and easily through needle sharing, and how are these diseases treated?”.

 

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